Say it with Banksy? Valentine’s gift catapults house to street art fame


A beguiling piece of street art depicting a girl firing a bunch of flowers into the air using a catapult has appeared on the side of a house in Bristol, the home city of Banksy.

The artist has not confirmed the work as his own but it caused crowds to gather and prompted the owner of the building to worry about how to protect what may turn out to be a valuable work.

Residents in the Barton Hill area of the city awoke on Thursday to find the piece, which was taken by many to be a nod to Valentine’s Day.

Bristol Somali Community Association tweeted: “Today in Barton Hill, we woke up with this remarkable mural art painted on one of the houses of the area.

“We hope it’s Banksy’s work. Come and have a look yourself. Whoever painted, it’s worth admiring their creativity. Thank you.”

Bristol Somali Community Association
(@BSCAssociation)

Today in Barton Hill, we woke up with this remarkable mural art painted on one of the houses of the area.

We hope it’s Banksy’s work.

Come and have a look yourself. Whoever painted, it’s worth admiring their creativity.
Thank you@TristanCorkPost @bbcrb pic.twitter.com/ppEiKAaOrH


February 13, 2020

The Banksy expert John Brandler said he believed the piece may well by the elusive artist.

“I would say it’s a Banksy,” he said. Brandler added that the piece had the sparsity and simplicity that the best Banksys have. “I think it’s lovely.”

Banksy often confirms his artworks by posting images of them on Instagram or his website but there is sometimes a lag between a work appearing and his endorsement.

Kelly Woodruff, who co-owns the property on the corner of Marsh Lane and Avonvale Road, said: “It arrived on our wall overnight. I got tagged into Facebook with someone saying, is this your property?

“And we were like, ‘woah it is’. We are super excited, obviously, and it’s my dad’s birthday today so we are very excited to have such a brilliant birthday gift. We are Bristol born and bred, and its’s just so exciting.”

The house is split into three flats and Woodruff and her father Edwin, 67, are working out how to protect it.

She said: “We really want to preserve it, but he’s given us a bit of a headache. First thing’s first is to maybe get some Perspex to preserve it so everyone can enjoy it and then try and get some professional advice. It has been a crazy, with lots of people being able to come and enjoy it and we want people to be able to continue doing that.

“I just kept like squealing and I’ve not stopped smiling all day. It’s just so special. They are calling it the Valentine’s Day Banksy.

“There isn’t a handbook for these kind of scenarios – we’ve never been in this situation so any advice is welcome.”





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