politics

UK 'to ban travel from more countries' as Omnicron mutant Covid variant spreads


Ministers were said to be considering adding two more countries to the UK Government’s travel ‘red list’ amid fears over the ‘worst’ ever Covid variant now known as Omnicron

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How worried should we be about the new Covid variant?

Boris Johnson is reportedly set to ban travel from at least two more countries as the Omnicron super-mutant Covid variant spreads.

The plans are aimed at preventing the import of the ‘worst ever’ coronavirus variant, but experts have said it is probably already circulating within the UK after being detected in Belgium.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid said there is “huge international concern” surrounding the strain after banning flights from South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Eswatini, Zimbabwe and Namibia to limit its spread.

With Moderna “rapidly advancing” a booster jab to combat Omicron, Mr Javid told MPs there are concerns the variant may be more transmissible, make existing vaccines less effective and may hinder one of the UK’s Covid treatments, Ronapreve.







Flights from six countries in Africa are set to be banned (file photo)
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Ministers were facing calls to impose tougher restrictions to prevent a wave of the new variant arriving in Britain while a Delta surge is ongoing, as Belgium became the first EU country to announce a case.

Professor John Edmunds, who advises the Government as part of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), warned that could create a “very, very, very difficult situation”.

Ministers were considering adding two more countries to the travel ‘red list’ on Friday night, the Daily Mail reported.

A government adviser suggested Brits should be “ready for the possibility” of a return to Covid restrictions.

However, a senior government source told the newspaper that “people should not panic”.







A medical worker cares for Covid patients in Brussels (file photo)
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In the Netherlands, health officials said dozens of people who arrived in Amsterdam on two flights from South Africa on Friday are likely infected with Covid-19.

They were conducting further testing to see if people are infected with the recently discovered Omicron variant.

Dutch officials estimated that 85 of about 600 passengers had Covid.

Omicron was first discovered in South Africa and has been designated a “variant of concern” by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Senior UK scientists had previously described it as the ‘worst ever’ Covid variant detected so far.

The WHO warned that preliminary evidence suggests the variant, which the organisation named Omicron, has an increased risk of reinfection and may spread more rapidly than other strains.

The EU, US and Canada all followed Britain’s move to impose travel restrictions on visitors from southern Africa ahead of the WHO adding the strain, also known as B.1.1.529, to its highest category for concerning variants.

Experts at the WHO said there is early evidence to suggest Omicron has an “increased risk of reinfection” and its rapid spread in South Africa suggests it has a “growth advantage”.

No cases have been detected in the UK but its arrival in Belgium – after being found in Botswana, Hong Kong and Israel – has heightened concerns.

Marc Van Ranst, a virologist at the Rega Institute in Belgium, said a sample was confirmed as the variant in a traveller who returned from Egypt on November 11 before first showing symptoms 11 days later.

The six African countries were added to the UK’s travel red list on Thursday evening and passengers arriving in the UK from these countries from 4am on Sunday will be required to book and pay for a Government-approved hotel quarantine for 10 days.

Downing Street urged anyone who has arrived from those countries recently to get tested.

Mr Javid said discussions are ongoing over the prospect of adding further countries to the red list, telling the Commons the Government “won’t hesitate to act if we need to do so”.

Mr Johnson held a call with South Africa’s president Cyril Ramaphosa on Friday afternoon after foreign minister Naledi Pandor said the flight ban “seems to have been rushed”.

The Prime Minister “commended South Africa’s rapid genomic sequencing” and its “leadership in transparently sharing scientific data”, Downing Street said.

“They discussed the challenges posed globally by the new Covid-19 variant and ways to work together to deal with it and reopen international travel,” a statement said.

Prof Edmunds said the new strain “is a huge worry” and that “all the data suggests” it would be able to evade current immunity.

“Our fears are it would do so to a large extent,” he told BBC Radio 4’s PM programme.

Prof Edmunds urged ministers to look at extending travel restrictions and to prepare a plan to deal with Omicron because “at some point we’re going to get this variant here in the UK”.


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He suggested mass testing and local restrictions must be looked at while other preparations could include making the booster programme more rapid, perhaps by reducing the gap between second and third doses, and widening it to younger age groups.

“Even the vaccines don’t work particularly well against this new variant, they do against Delta, and we’re still fighting a Delta wave and we certainly don’t want to be fighting both at the same time,” he said.

“There are things we can do and we need to get on with it very rapidly.”

The Government said as of 9am on Friday, there had been a further 50,091 lab-confirmed Covid-19 cases in the UK, the highest reported daily figure since October 21.

It also said a further 160 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Friday, bringing the UK total to 144,593.

South African scientists fear the variant is behind a dramatic rise in cases in some regions, including Gauteng province, which includes the cities of Pretoria and Johannesburg.

Pfizer/BioNTech, which has produced a vaccine against Covid-19, is already studying the new variant’s ability to evade vaccines.

Experts have said vaccines can be tweaked to tackle new variants as they emerge.

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