politics

Theresa May performs some VERY awkward dancing with school kids as she touches down in South Africa


THERESA May turned her hand to dancefloor diplomacy today with some very awkward dancing at the opening of her African trade trip.

Once branded the “Maybot” by critics for her wooden style, the Prime Minister is unlikely to be sparking a viral craze like the Mo-Bot any time soon.

 Theresa May engaged in some very awkward dancing in South Africa today

PA

Theresa May engaged in some very awkward dancing in South Africa today
 She got involved as she was greeted by schoolchildren in Cape Town

PA

She got involved as she was greeted by schoolchildren in Cape Town

Her boogie came as she announced a scholarship programme for 100 African youngsters to study in Britain at the start of three-day trip across the continent.

Mrs May was filmed swaying from side to side and bobbing up and down as she was greeted by a group of pupils dancing energetically in Cape Town.

The PM smiled and laughed throughout and later joined in with a second dance in her visit to the I D Mkize School in the South African capital.

During a packed assembly, she told the pupils: “Can I thank all those young people who were involved in the performances outside who welcomed me.”

 Theresa May has touched down for the start of a three-day trade trip to Africa today
Theresa May has touched down for the start of a three-day trade trip to Africa today
Prime Minister Theresa May arrives in South Africa to secure trade deals

She used her visit to the school to announce the Chevening Scholarship scheme would be opened up to 100 more of “Africa’s brightest young people”.

Mrs May said: “What I see before me in this hall today is the future of South Africa.”

She added: “I’d like to think that some of you when you get older if you’re thinking of going to university that you might think of coming to one of our great universities in the UK.”

The PM will later meet with the South African President Cyril Rampaphosa  for talks and present him with the ship’s bell from the SS Mendi, which sank off the cost of Britain in 1917 – costing 600 South African lives.

 Her boogie came as she announced a scholarship programme for 100 African youngsters to study in Britain

PA

Her boogie came as she announced a scholarship programme for 100 African youngsters to study in Britain
 The PM smiled and laughed throughout and later joined in with a second dance in her visit to the I D Mkize School

PA

The PM smiled and laughed throughout and later joined in with a second dance in her visit to the I D Mkize School

This morning she also made a speech pledging to rip up UK aid rules to make it “unashamedly” benefit British firms.

Mrs May wants to spend the UK’s £13.9billion development budget giving companies greater confidence to invest in Africa as in an expansion of its global outlook after Brexit.

She vowed to divert taxpayer handouts to the continent and use it instead to roll the pitch for the UK to become the world’s “number one investor in Africa” by 2022 – overtaking the US.

The money would be moved from charities and NGOs to help states tackle corruption and invest in infrastructure and security.

 The Prime Minister insisted leaving without a deal would not be the end of the world

Reuters

The Prime Minister insisted leaving without a deal would not be the end of the world
 The benefits and problems with not getting a deal
The benefits and problems with not getting a deal

As part of the visit, the first major trip since unveiling her soft-Brexit Chequers deal, the PM will also visit Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in jail.

And she will take two dozen business chiefs with her in a bid to whip up a slew of high investment deals.

Speaking as she touched down this morning, she turned her attention to Brexit, insisting that No Deal would “not be the end of the world”.

Mrs May dismissed Chancellor Philip Hammond’s doomsday warnings as a “work in progress.”

The Mendi Bell explained

THERESA May will present South Africa with the Mendi Bell tomorrow – salvaged from the wreck of the nation’s worse maritime disaster.

More than 640 troops, mostly black South Africans, died when the SS Mendi perished in the English Channel in 1917.

They were on their way to join the Allied forces on the Western Front in World War One when it collided with a Royal Mail boat off the Isle of Wight, but no assistance was given to drowning victims.

The bell has become a symbol of the South Africa’s First World War remembrance, and a protest at racial inequality.

The recovered bell was donated anonymously to the BBC last year after the wreck was discovered in the 1970s.

Mrs May will present it to the country’s President Cyril Ramaphosa in a ceremony in Cape Town on Tuesday – just over a century after it was lost at sea.

In 1995 the Queen and then South African leader Nelson Mandela unveiled a memorial to the Mendi victims.

And she stressed it was important to let Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab unveil the Government’s contingency plans for crashing out of the EU without a trade deal in place.

Last Wednesday Mr Hammond sparked uproar from fellow ministers and Tory MPs after publishing a doom-laden warning that Britain would face an £80 billion hike in borrowing in a No Deal scenario on the same day Mr Raab set out the first tranche of Whitehall emergency plans.

But speaking for the first time on the row, Mrs May sided with Mr Raab in the latest Cabinet split and echoed claims from the head of the WTO that No Deal “would not be a walk in the park, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world.”

Dominic Raab says Brexit talks could collapse if the EU doesn’t match our ambition and pragmatism

 

 

 

 





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