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Start-up develops a $92,000 flying vehicle dubbed Jetson One that 'anyone can own and fly' 


The real life Jetsons! Start-up develops a $92,000 flying vehicle dubbed Jetson One that ‘anyone can own and fly’

  • The electric flying vehicle can operate for about 15 minutes on a single charge 
  • It comes 50 per cent complete with the rest built at the new owners home
  • The device, which sells for £66,000 ($92,000) is sold out completely in 2022










A startup from Sweden has developed a personal flying vehicle that it says ‘anyone can fly’ called the Jetson One, and it is available for £66,000 ($92,000).

The all electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft was launched this month, three years after the firm released a ‘proof of concept’ prototype in 2018.

‘Our mission is to make flight available to everyone. The Jetson one is an electric helicopter that you can own and fly. We intend to make everyone a pilot,’ said Jetson co-founder Peter Ternstrom. 

The single-seat ‘built at home’ kit-copter can zoom along at 63mph thanks to its lightweight aluminium and carbon fibre frame and 118 horesepower engine. 

A startup from Sweden has developed a personal flying vehicle that it says 'anyone can fly' called the Jetson One, and it is available for £66,000 ($92,000)

A startup from Sweden has developed a personal flying vehicle that it says ‘anyone can fly’ called the Jetson One, and it is available for £66,000 ($92,000)

The car is named after The Jetsons, a fictional 'future family' created in the early 1960s by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and including UFO-like flying cars

The car is named after The Jetsons, a fictional ‘future family’ created in the early 1960s by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and including UFO-like flying cars

However, the firm have already sold out of the 198lb vehicles in their 2022 run, with just 12 units produced, and there are just three slots left for 2023.  

The car is named after The Jetsons, a fictional ‘future family’ created in the early 1960s by Hanna-Barbera Productions, and including UFO-like flying cars.

It is primarily designed for play, rather than as a real personal transport vehicle, as it has a maximum operational distance of about 15 miles.

The all electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft was launched this month, three years after the firm released a 'proof of concept' prototype in 2018

The all electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft was launched this month, three years after the firm released a ‘proof of concept’ prototype in 2018

The single-seat 'built at home' kit-copter can zoom along at 63mph thanks to its lightweight aluminium and carbon fibre frame and 118 horesepower engine

The single-seat ‘built at home’ kit-copter can zoom along at 63mph thanks to its lightweight aluminium and carbon fibre frame and 118 horesepower engine

That is based on a pilot who weighs about 13 stone – those weighing less or more could see a greater or lesser flight time before it needs to go back on charge.

The vehicle is 112 x 95 x 41 inches, and has prop arms that are designed to fold in on themselves, leaving an ‘on the ground’ profile, similar to a touring motorbike. 

Reserving a build slot for the single-seater Jetson One requires a £16,000 ($22,000) deposit, and when it arrives, it is half assembled, with the rest ‘built at home.’

It is an octo-copter with four arms stretching out from the fuselage, each containing a pair of rotors – producing lift.

In the US it is classed as an ultralight aircraft, meaning no pilot licence is required to operate the vehicle, according to Jetson. 

It is primarily designed for play, rather than as a real personal transport vehicle, as it has a maximum operational distance of about 15 miles

It is primarily designed for play, rather than as a real personal transport vehicle, as it has a maximum operational distance of about 15 miles

The vehicle is 112 x 95 x 41 inches, and has prop arms that are designed to fold in on themselves, leaving an 'on the ground' profile, similar to a touring motorbike

The vehicle is 112 x 95 x 41 inches, and has prop arms that are designed to fold in on themselves, leaving an ‘on the ground’ profile, similar to a touring motorbike

It is flown using a throttle lever, a joystick and a pedal, and comes with an onboard computer that keeps it stable during flight and watches for ground obstacles.

It can climb up to 4,921ft, although in the video shared of it operating, the pilot keeps it relatively close to the ground.

This might be due to the fact it only operates for about 15 minutes on a single charge, meaning there may not be time for extended higher-altitude flying. 

The onboard system is capable of hovering and gently bringing down to the ground if the pilot takes hands off the controls, but there is also a ballistic parachute if it were to run out of power or the motor fails. 

Take-off for air taxis! NASA is testing an electric aircraft that takes off and lands vertically – and could shuttle passengers at 200mph across busy cities by 2024 

NASA is testing a new electric aircraft that can take off and land vertically, in the hope that by 2024 will be able to shuttle passengers across busy cities at 200mph.

The Joby Aviation vehicle could one day serve as an air taxi service for those in cities and surrounding areas, adding an alternative mode of transport for people and goods, according to the NASA team working in Big Sur, California.

The all-electrical ‘flying taxi’ can take off and land vertically and is a helicopter powered by six rotors designed to be as quiet as possible. 

The 10 day study started on September 1, and will see officials from the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center test its performance and acoustics. 

The electrical vertical take off and landing (eVTOL) vehicle is the first in a number of aircraft that will be tested as part of NASA’s Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) campaign to find future rapid modes of transport that could be approved for public use. 

 





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