SEAT is experimenting with technology that studies a driver to detect if they're falling asleep 


Spanish car manufacturer Seat is working on technology to track a driver’s eyes and spot signs of drowsiness. 

The firm has partnered with an Israeli firm that has built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver’s eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position.

Eyesight Technologies uses cameras and sensors and combines this with artificial intelligence to spot early warning signs the driver may be falling asleep. 

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Spanish car manufacturer Seat is working on technology to track a driver's eyes and spot signs of drowsiness. The firm has partnered with an Israeli firm that has built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver's eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position

Spanish car manufacturer Seat is working on technology to track a driver’s eyes and spot signs of drowsiness. The firm has partnered with an Israeli firm that has built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver’s eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position

Eyesight Technologies uses cameras and sensors and combines this with artificial intelligence to spot early warning signs the driver may be falling asleep

Eyesight Technologies uses cameras and sensors and combines this with artificial intelligence to spot early warning signs the driver may be falling asleep

The Tel Aviv-based company says an alert is sounded if the system detects the driver is asleep. It also works if it spots the driver is distracted by their mobile phone

The Tel Aviv-based company says an alert is sounded if the system detects the driver is asleep. It also works if it spots the driver is distracted by their mobile phone

HOW DOES THE SYSTEM WORK?  

Tel Aviv-based Eyesight Technologies built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver’s eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position.

It collects the data from cameras and sensors in the cabin that are trained on the driver. 

The information and algorithm are driven by AI and helps spot early warning signs the driver may be falling asleep. 

The system can also remember the mirror and seat position preference of each driver.  

The Tel Aviv-based company says an alert is sounded if the system detects the driver is asleep.

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It also works if it spots the driver is distracted by their mobile phone. 

The technology can also identify the driver from previous trips and adjust the seats, mirrors, heating settings and other cabin features automatically.  

Eventually, the software will also be able to detect pedestrians and analyse whether the driver has spotted them as well.

Stefan Ilijevic, the head of product innovation at SEAT, said: ‘In total more than 90 per cent of the road accidents in Europe are caused by human factor.

‘The main reasons include distraction and tiredness, excessive speed and alcohol and drugs.

‘At SEAT we are working on solutions to prevent negligence behind the steering wheel and significantly reduce road accidents.

‘We partner with some of the world’s brightest companies on important technology to save lives, since our long-term vision is a world with zero accidents.’ 

In-car cameras and sensors are becoming increasingly common , with anti-drowsiness and security systems that monitor passengers becoming more widespread. 

At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona last year, BMW unveiled a prototype vehicle that lets drivers control the inside of the car using only their eyes.

A high-definition camera mounted in the dashboard will track a customer’s head and eyes to precisely identify what they are looking at – either inside or outside the car.

BMW claims drivers will be able to look outside the car windscreen at a restaurant they are passing and learn its menu, opening hours and even book a table.

So-called gaze recognition will be available to customers for the first time in the BMW iNEXT as of 2021 alongside improved gesture and voice recognition in a package the German car manufacturer is calling Natural interaction.

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Seat, along with most major car manufacturers, is investing heavily in its technological infrastructure, with it recently announcing a system that lets cars talk to the road infrastructure around it.  

For example, the latest Seat Leon is connected to the cloud which provides instantaneous data on nearby traffic lights.

It then tells drivers what colour the light will be when they arrive – assuming that they are not exceeding the speed limit. 

Seat, along with most major car manufacturers, is investing heavily in its technological infrastructure, with it recently announcing a system that lets cars talk to the road infrastructure around it. For example, the latest Seat Leon is connected to the cloud which provides instantaneous data on nearby traffic lights (pictured)

Seat, along with most major car manufacturers, is investing heavily in its technological infrastructure, with it recently announcing a system that lets cars talk to the road infrastructure around it. For example, the latest Seat Leon is connected to the cloud which provides instantaneous data on nearby traffic lights (pictured) 

Information will be shared with the on-board 10-inch infotainment screen and allow drivers to slow down or speed up their approach to avoid unwanted delays.   

When the Leon approaches a traffic light, an alert appears on the screen saying whether it will be red, green or yellow by the time the car arrives. 

It then calculates how far the car is from the lights and the speed it was travelling using real-time traffic data sent to the ‘cloud’ directly from the car. 

The process – which takes just 300 milliseconds – connects cars to the cloud via an internet connection.  

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced it is rolling out Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) to most of its vehicles. 

Ford wants to fit 80 per cent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming road accidents, bad weather and traffic jams.

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The system pools data from other connected road users, emergency services and the authorities and beams it from the cloud directly to the car. 

Alerts pop up on the car’s dashboard display warning the driver about what lies around the corner. 

At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona last year, BMW unveiled a prototype vehicle that lets drivers control the inside of the car using only their eyes. A high-definition camera mounted in the dashboard will track a customer's head and eyes to precisely identify what they are looking at - either inside or outside the car

At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona last year, BMW unveiled a prototype vehicle that lets drivers control the inside of the car using only their eyes. A high-definition camera mounted in the dashboard will track a customer’s head and eyes to precisely identify what they are looking at – either inside or outside the car 

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced it is rolling out Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) to most of its vehicles. Ford wants to fit 80 per cent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming road accidents, bad weather and traffic jams

Rival Ford is also working on the connectivity of its vehicles and recently announced it is rolling out Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) to most of its vehicles. Ford wants to fit 80 per cent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming road accidents, bad weather and traffic jams



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