Home tech news Scientists develop ‘nanoparticle’ Covid vaccine that triggers a 10x stronger immune response

Scientists develop ‘nanoparticle’ Covid vaccine that triggers a 10x stronger immune response

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Scientists develop ‘nanoparticle’ Covid vaccine that triggers a 10x stronger immune response


The researchers in the US have created a ‘nanoparticle’ vaccine (Picture: AP; UW Medicine)

A new kind of experimental coronavirus vaccine is in development that could be far more powerful than any other being investigated.

Scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine have created a jab that triggers an immune response 10 times stronger than anything generated by Covid survivors.

Furthermore, it seems to produce a stronger memory cell response. Meaning that if a patient is reinfected they can produce antibodies more quickly.

These results all come from current trials being performed on mice.The vaccine is built using ‘nanoparticles’ which mimic the structural features of viruses. This makes it easier for it to mold to the size and shape of virus receptors – the ‘gateway’ to healthy cells that trigger infection.

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‘We hope that our nanoparticle platform may help fight this pandemic that is causing so much damage to our world,’ said Dr Neil King, an assistant professor of biochemistry at the UW School of Medicine.  

‘The potency, stability, and manufacturability of this vaccine candidate differentiate it from many others under investigation.’

The design of an ultrapotent Covid-19 vaccine candidate (Picture: UW Medicine)

During the study, which was published in the journal Cell, the increase in immunity in mice even occurred when the vaccine was administered at a five-fold lower dose.

Researcher working at the University of Washington School of Medicine on an ultrapotent Covid-19 vaccine candidate (Picture: UW Medicine)

According to KIRO 7, the vaccine is being licensed to two biotech companies to be mass-manufactured, and clinical trials are expected to begin by the end of the year. 

‘I am delighted that our studies of antibody responses to coronaviruses led to the design of this promising vaccine candidate,’ said co-lead author Dr David Veesler, a UW associate professor of biochemistry.


MORE : Oxford coronavirus vaccine shows ‘strong immune response’ in the elderly


MORE : German Pfizer vaccine ‘could be given to Brits before Christmas’





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