auto

Over Two-Thirds Of Americans Don't Want A Hybrid Or EV: Study – MSN


Range anxiety and the charging infrastructure are still major concerns among new car buyers.

Depending on who you talk to, electric vehicles are either on the verge of going mainstream, or they already are. There’s certainly a push from most automakers to go electric, but are buyers in the United States ready for that step? A recent study from Deloitte suggests the answer is no for a majority of new car shoppers. At least not right away.



2022 Kia EV6 US Model Rear View


© Motor1.com
2022 Kia EV6 US Model Rear View

Deloitte has offered a deep-dive report on the global automotive landscape since 2010, and this year’s study takes a look at electrification, among other things. More than 26,000 people in 25 countries were surveyed, and the takeaway for US new car shoppers is that internal combustion still rules the day. 69 percent of those surveyed said they want a gasoline or diesel engine without any electrification in their next new car. 17 percent are okay with a traditional hybrid, but only 5 percent are interested in a plug-in hybrid. Similarly, 5 percent said they would consider a pure EV. 4 percent are listed as choosing “other.”

US buyers aren’t the only ones still favoring a combustion-powered car for the near future. The survey lists Southeast Asia as 66 percent for gas or diesel cars, with India and China both coming in at 58 percent. Germany trends the other direction at 49 percent, followed by Japan at 39 percent. South Korea is the most electric-friendly region with only 37 percent choosing internal combustion for future vehicle purchases. Even then, only 24 percent favor a pure EV, versus 35 percent for some form of hybrid.

Electric Vehicles Are Coming, Ready Or Not:

The survey identifies concerns over range and charging networks as primary reasons for buyers shying away from electricity. However, with several automakers pledging to offer electric-only vehicles in the next 10 or so years, buyers may soon have little choice when it comes to a new car purchase.

Source: Deloitte via Axios



READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.  Learn more