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North America sets record for the hottest June ever as temps rise 2°F higher than 30-year average


The recent heatwave that spread across North America, leaving a ‘heat dome’ over the western part of the continent, resulted in the hottest June on record, climate officials said on Wednesday.

According to Europe’s Copernicus Climate Change Service agency, the average temperature for June in North America spiked 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the average from 1991-2020.

The average surface temperature was 0.25 degrees Fahrenheit higher than it was in June 2012, which had held the previous record.  

‘For North America, record-breaking heatwave conditions were centered initially over the southwestern USA and then over the northwestern USA and south western Canada,’ a statement accompanying the data reads.

‘The all-time record for daily-maximum temperature in Canada was broken three days in a row in British Columbia.’  

June's heatwave across North America resulted in the continent having the hottest June on record. The average temperature spiked 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the average from 1991-2020

June’s heatwave across North America resulted in the continent having the hottest June on record. The average temperature spiked 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the average from 1991-2020

The average surface temperature for June in North America was 0.25 degrees Fahrenheit higher than June 2012, the previous record

The average surface temperature for June in North America was 0.25 degrees Fahrenheit higher than June 2012, the previous record 

More than half of the US West is facing ‘extreme’ drought conditions including wide areas of California and Oregon, a region scientists have said may be going through the worst drought period in centuries, the New York Times reported. 

There is also an extreme heatwave in Canada that has stretched down to Washington and Oregon creating record temperatures while California is suffering from forest fires.

The ‘once in 10,000 years’ event is being caused by a heat dome, which means the warmth extends high into the atmosphere and impacts pressure and wind patterns.

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A mountain of hot air is trapped by high-pressure conditions, further heating its and compressing it like a lid and wedging the high pressure between areas of low pressure, pushing cooler air away.  

The drought has brought on a crisis to the diverse basin filled with flat vistas of sprawling alfalfa and potato fields, teeming wetlands and steep canyons of old-growth forests.  

The 'once in 10,000 years' event is being caused by a heat dome, which means the warmth extends high into the atmosphere and impacts pressure and wind patterns

The ‘once in 10,000 years’ event is being caused by a heat dome, which means the warmth extends high into the atmosphere and impacts pressure and wind patterns

The wild temperatures are stretching from the US west coast up to Canada where records have now been broken for three days in a row

The wild temperatures are stretching from the US west coast up to Canada where records have now been broken for three days in a row

The Climate Change Service agency also noted that the European continent had its second-warmest June on record, behind only June 2019, up 1.5 degrees Celsius over the 1991-2020 average.

Northwest and southern Africa, along with Iran, Afghanistan and western Pakistan also saw ‘unusually high temperatures,’ Copernicus added in its climate bulletin.

‘Arctic Siberia also experienced high temperatures. Antarctic temperatures were predominantly colder than usual.’

June 2021 was the fourth hottest June globally, behind 2016, 2019 and 2020

June 2021 was the fourth hottest June globally, behind 2016, 2019 and 2020

June 2021 was the fourth hottest June globally, behind 2016, 2019 and 2020.

‘Globally, the twelve-month period to June 2021 was 0.28 degrees Celsius warmer than the 1991-2020 average,’ the statement noted.

It’s likely that the US will experience a hotter than normal summer, according to recent analysis from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as climate change continues to disrupt weather patterns all over the planet.   

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Scientists largely agree that temperatures could rise anywhere between 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 degrees Celsius) and 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius) by the end of the century, due to rising carbon emissions and greenhouse gases.

Scientists largely agree that temperatures could rise anywhere between 2.7-5.4 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century, due to rising carbon emissions and greenhouse gases

Scientists largely agree that temperatures could rise anywhere between 2.7-5.4 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century, due to rising carbon emissions and greenhouse gases

THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT IS TRYING TO LIMIT TEMPERATURE RISES BY REDUCING CARBON EMISSIONS  

With June 2021 being the hottest temperature on record for North America and the second warmest for the European continent, it renews interest in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement to curb temperature rises. 

First signed in 2015, the agreement is an international agreement to control and limit climate change.

It hopes to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2°C (3.6ºF) ‘and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C (2.7°F)’.

It seems the more ambitious goal of restricting global warming to 1.5°C (2.7°F) may be more important than ever, according to previous research which claims 25 per cent of the world could see a significant increase in drier conditions.

Shortly after being sworn in as US president, Joe Biden returned the US to the Paris climate accords after former president Trump removed the US from the agreement.

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main goals with regards to reducing emissions:

1) A long-term goal of keeping the increase in global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels

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2) To aim to limit the increase to 1.5°C, since this would significantly reduce risks and the impacts of climate change

3) Governments agreed on the need for global emissions to peak as soon as possible, recognizing that this will take longer for developing countries

4) To undertake rapid reductions thereafter in accordance with the best available science

Source: European Commission

 



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