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Newsreader apologises for announcing the death of William Shakespeare 405 years late


Newsreader apologises for announcing the death of William Shakespeare 405 years late after she confused him with his namesake who died last week in Coventry

  • Noelia Novillo gained world notoriety after confusing William Shakespeare who died in 1616 with the first British man to get the Covid jab
  •  William ‘Bill’ Shakespeare, an 81-year-old from Coventry, passed away last week
  • The newsreader has opted for a no-holds-barred apology in light of the mistake

The newsreader who blundered by announcing the death of William Shakespeare 405 years late has made a grovelling apology. 

Noelia Novillo blew her social media fans a kiss today after confessing to making a mistake but insisting she would bounce back stronger. 

The Argentinian newsreader gained world notoriety after confusing the famous playwright who died in 1616 with the first British man to get the Covid jab. 

Noelia Novillo blew her social media fans a kiss today after confessing to making a mistake but insisting she would bounce back stronger

Noelia Novillo blew her social media fans a kiss today after confessing to making a mistake but insisting she would bounce back stronger

The Argentinian newsreader gained world notoriety after confusing the famous playwright who died in 1616 with the first Brit to get the Covid jab

The Argentinian newsreader gained world notoriety after confusing the famous playwright who died in 1616 with the first Brit to get the Covid jab

Brunette Novillo said on Argentinian TV station Canal 26, over footage of Bill Shakespeare chatting as he received his jab: 'We've got news that has stunned all of us given the greatness of this man'

Brunette Novillo said on Argentinian TV station Canal 26, over footage of Bill Shakespeare chatting as he received his jab: ‘We’ve got news that has stunned all of us given the greatness of this man’ 

William ‘Bill’ Shakespeare, an 81-year-old from Coventry, passed away last week five months after receiving his vaccine. 

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Novillo said on Argentinian TV station Canal 26, over footage of Bill Shakespeare chatting as he received his jab: ‘We’ve got news that has stunned all of us given the greatness of this man. 

‘We’re talking about William Shakespeare and his death. 

‘As we all know, he’s one of the most important writers in the English language – for me the master. Here he is. 

‘He was the first man to get the coronavirus vaccine. He’s died in England at the age of 81.’ 

Initially the newsreader tried to blame the blunder on the fact she had ‘missed out a full stop, a comma, some brackets’ as the gaffe went viral. 

Viewers were left baffled when Noelia Novillo (pictured), a newsreader on Canal 26, reported that iconic playwright William Shakespeare had died this month

Viewers were left baffled when Noelia Novillo (pictured), a newsreader on Canal 26, reported that iconic playwright William Shakespeare had died this month

Noelia Novillo (pictured) mistakenly said 'one of the most important writers in the English language' had died five months after getting Covid-19 vaccine

Noelia Novillo (pictured) mistakenly said ‘one of the most important writers in the English language’ had died five months after getting Covid-19 vaccine

But she has now opted for a full no-holds-barred apology in light of her astonishing mistake, which prompted some fans to claim today it was part of a cunning plan to enhance her public profile which she had already been carefully crafting with risqué Instagram photos. 

She told her social media followers in a selfie video: ‘I didn’t want to let this opportunity to talk with you go by. 

‘I had a few seconds on the station yesterday but I’m taking this moment to do so on my social media. 

‘I simply want to say sorry and ask you to forgive me. ‘Anyone can make a mistake and here I am to own up to my fall. 

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‘After each fall one bounces back stronger. In life you fall and you get up. ‘Learning from mistakes. That’s it. They’re lessons.’ 

The ultimate comedy of errors came after an 81-year-old man from Coventry called William 'Bill' Shakespeare (pictured) died five months after getting the Covid-19 vaccine

The ultimate comedy of errors came after an 81-year-old man from Coventry called William ‘Bill’ Shakespeare (pictured) died five months after getting the Covid-19 vaccine

William Shakespeare (pictured) famously died in 1616 after penning 38 famous plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Twelfth Night and As You Like It

William Shakespeare (pictured) famously died in 1616 after penning 38 famous plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Twelfth Night and As You Like It 

Ending her short apology with a kiss to fans, she added: ‘Here I am to recognise my error. Thank you very much for listening. Have a nice day.’ 

One of Noelia’s 56,000 Instagram followers joked: ‘Making a mistake is human and you are beautiful (Also we all know you did it on purpose to get more fans.’ 

A colleague on her TV station added: ‘You are an excellent professional, a person with a big heart and one of the best people to work with. 

‘We all make mistakes every day. We love you. Big kiss.’ 

Noelia had already built up an army of Instagram fans before her blunder about the Bard with selfie photos in her underwear showing intimate body tattoos. 

One follower called her a ‘Goddess’ after she posted a photo of herself in a matching mauve jumper and knickers with a cappuccino in her hand. 

She is not the first Canal 26 presenter to make headlines. Former TyC Sports weather girl Sol Perez, who gained fame with her racy Instagram photos, now works for the channel. 

Last June Romina Malaspina created controversy by reading the news in a see-through top with nothing on underneath. 

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