politics

MPs to vote on social care as threat of Tory rebellion looms



T

he Government could face a backbench rebellion on Monday amid anger from MPs that the least well-off may still have to sell their homes to pay for their care.

MPs will consider on Monday whether to accept changes to the Government’s proposed social care reforms.

But Red Wall Tory Christian Wakeford had warned that it “shouldn’t be taken for granted that we’re just going to walk through the same lobby”.

It comes amid lingering ill-feeling on the backbenches after being whipped to support former MP Owen Paterson in a standards row, which Mr Wakeford admitted looked like allies were trying to get a colleague “off the hook”, only to be embarrassed when ministers U-turned.

File photo dated 04/09/21 of a care home resident holding hands with her daughter. (Andrew Matthews/PA) / PA Wire

But Health Secretary Sajid Javid said that “everyone will be better off” under the social care reforms.

In September, the Government announced that an £86,000 cap on care costs would be put in place from October 2023.

It also said that people with assets up to £20,000 will not have to contribute anything to their care (up from £14,250), while those with assets to £100,000 will be eligible to receive some local authority support (up from £23,250).

But in a policy paper released on Wednesday, the Government said that for people who receive financial support for part of their care from their local authority, only the share they contribute themselves will go towards the £86,000 cap.

The change has caused uproar with experts who said it would mean such households receiving “far less protection than expected”, and that they could still face catastrophic costs that would eat up a greater share of their assets compared with wealthier recipients.

Labour said its analysis had shown the changes would mean the average homeowner in two-thirds of northern areas will have to pay more towards their care. In the Midlands a third would be worse off.



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