Kirsty Gallagher health forecast: Sky Sports presenter Alzheimer’s risk revealed


The 44-year-old’s DNA blueprint revealed Kirsty has a heightened sensitivity to develop Alzheimer’s disease – despite her healthy lifestyle.

Kirsty thanked her parents – former Ryder Cup captain Bernard Gallagher and mum Lesley – for her “very healthy” approach to life.

It’s reported the Scottish-born lass packs in three personal training sessions a week, plus running and swimming on top.

Moreover, the Mirror stated she sustained a well-balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, lean meat and fish.

Taking her health in her own hands, Kirsty acknowledges she will need to keep her brain “active” while “being as fit and healthy as you can”.

Alzheimer’s disease

The neurodegenerative brain disease is estimated to affect around two million Brits by 2050.

The Alzheimer’s Society outlined the symptoms of the condition, which includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking.

This happens as nerve cells within the brain are lost due to protein build up and abnormal structures called “plaques” and “tangles”.

The best protection you can have from developing the disease is leading a health lifestyle.

This includes regular physical exercise and keeping to a healthy weight, not smoking, and eating a healthy balanced diet.

Drinking in moderation, as well as keeping mentally and socially active can also help to reduce a person’s risk of the condition.

It’s also helpful to manage any underlying health conditions, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

Unfortunately, there are certain factors that can’t be controlled that can influence a person’s likelihood of developing the disease.

This involves ageing (especially surpassing 65 years of age), and being born a woman.

READ  A&E admissions down a third amid virus lockdown but calls to NHS 111 more than double

The majority of dementia isn’t inhered, but it’s not unheard of – although it tends to affect much younger people.

There have been 20 genes identified that are known to increase a person’s risk of the disease.





READ SOURCE

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here