politics

Jobs in North and Mids at twice risk of loss in anti-climate measures as London


Jobs in the North and Midlands are at nearly twice the risk of being lost due to anti-climate change measures as those in London, a new report has found.

Research shows 43% of jobs in the UK’s poorest regions are in high-carbon emitting industries compared to 37% in the rest of the UK.

It means as many as 10 million people will need to be replaced or retrained if the UK is to hit its target of net-zero emissions by 2050.

The East Midlands has the highest proportion of jobs in high-carbon industries, with 42%, closely followed by the West Midlands with 41%, Yorkshire and the Humber and the North West, which both have 38%.

In contrast, London and the South East have the lowest proportion of jobs in high-carbon industries, with 23% and 34% respectively.

In total, more than half of high emitting jobs are located in the North, Midlands and Scotland.



Boris Johnson announced new emissions targets last month

“Reducing carbon consumption to net zero is the socially responsible decision our generation has taken to help future generations,” Tory MP Dame Caroline Spelman, who co-chairs Onward’s Getting to Zero commission, said.

“But we must make sure the impact of this does not aggravate existing inequalities in our country.”

The UK was the first major economy to pass a law requiring it to have net zero emissions by 2050.

Last month (DEC) Boris Johnson announced a new target to reduce emissions by at least 68% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels.

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Co-chair and former Labour MP Caroline Flint said the looming deadlines would require “faster decision making than we are used to in Britain.”

She added: “In cleaning up our act, no community should be left behind. They will all have to be part of the journey and share the benefits.”





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