politics

'If David Amess were alive today he'd be first to say terror must never win'


MPs know that the voters who put them into office have the right to meet them face to face to air their problems and grievances. But we will understand if more of that is now done over Skype or Zoom.

Hundreds gathered today to pay respects to Sir David with a candle light vigil
Hundreds gathered today to pay respects to Sir David with a candle light vigil

Terror will not defeat brave MPs .

There is not a corner of our nation left untouched by the savage and senseless murder of Sir David Amess. He was one of the good guys.

A tireless worker on behalf of his constituents and a determined campaigner for causes close to his heart.

That is why he was universally loved and respected, not just by his own side but also by MPs in all political parties.

Sir David still had much public service to give, and it is the public who are the poorer for his death. But if he were alive today he would be the first to say terror must never win. It was why our elected representatives were back in their constituency surgeries today.





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To shy away now would be to give in to the perpetrators of violence.

MPs know that the voters who put them into office have the right to meet them face to face to air their problems and grievances. But we will understand if more of that is now done over Skype or Zoom.

We will understand if MPs choose to hold their surgeries in places more crowded than an almost-empty church. And if the law is changed so that killers of MPs face the same stiff sentences as they would for murdering police officers, then we would understand.

Because we elect our MPs to put their hearts and souls into working on our behalf. Not to see them slaughtered.

Vital workers deserve better

Care workers had a rotten deal before the pandemic struck. And their lives got worse because of a lack of PPE and Boris Johnson discharging hospital patients back into care homes without Covid testing.

As the UK slowly returns to normality, it cannot be business as usual for care staff.

That is why the Sunday Mirror is today launching our campaign to stop the care crisis on behalf of the old, the vulnerable and those who so selflessly look after them.







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Image:

Alamy Stock Photo)



Our aim is to press ministers into recruiting the extra staff the care sector needs and retain those it already has. And that will only happen if pay and conditions improve.

There are now 120,000 vacancies in social care and 42,000 more are likely to be created by the “no jab, no job” rule. And a further 627,000 care workers will be needed over the next decade if the UK is to cope with the ageing population.




That is why care work must be added to the Occupation Shortage List.

hat is why pay must be brought into line with NHS staff in similar roles.

Care workers must be treated like the professionals they are.

Not as compassionate skivvies to be brushed aside.

Their work is essential now and will become ever more important. And they must be fairly treated for all that they do.







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