science

Greenpeace release an 'alternative Christmas advert' featuring a comedy roast


Greenpeace has a talking potato battling a talking turkey in a parody of a comedy roast for it’s 2019 ‘alternative Christmas advert’.

The environmental charity says the advert is designed to highlight the impact eating meat has on deforestation. 

Set in a dingy comedy club, the advert features two of the leading characters of a traditional Christmas lunch hurling insults at one another.

‘The burns are harsh, and the crowd is loving it until Potato takes it too far, exposing Turkey’s dirty little secret’, says turkey actor and scriptwriter Jack Barry.

Greenpeace has a talking potato battling a talking turkey in a parody of a comedy roast for it's 2019 'alternative Christmas advert' (pictured)

Greenpeace has a talking potato battling a talking turkey in a parody of a comedy roast for it’s 2019 ‘alternative Christmas advert’ (pictured)

The video features the potato and the turkey hurling insults at each other on stage in a dingey looking nightclub.

The turkey opens with ‘It’s great to be here roasting the humble potato. People call it a staple food because you’d rather staple your lips together than eat it.’

The potato, played by Annie McGrath, responded with: ‘That’s rich considering people only eat turkey for one day of the year. Probably because they need the other 364 for their mouths to re-hydrate.’

The video features the potato and the turkey hurling insults at each other on stage in a dingey looking nightclub

The video features the potato and the turkey hurling insults at each other on stage in a dingey looking nightclub

The insults kept flowing back and forth until a line from turkey triggered an alarm.

Turkey said: ‘You’re dull, you’re pasty white and you’re impossible to get rid of. You’re the Piers Morgan of the Christmas lunch’. 

Things went quiet in the room when potato told the audience that the turkey eats feed that came from the rain forest. Saying: ‘We all know you’re dirty little feed habit is destroying the planet. 

‘They have to chop down so many trees to grow his food he may as well of come here in a hummer powered by hair spray, cow farts and the broken dreams of Greta Thunberg’.

Greenpeace says it felt the need to create the advert to make people realise the impact their eating habits are having on the environment. 

The campaign group says two thirds of the UK’s soya is imported from South America, where it is a leading cause of deforestation.

‘An area of land the size of Glasgow would be needed to grow enough soya to fatten the 10 million turkeys Brits eat every Christmas’, a spokesperson said.

The advert pitches a potato against a turkey in a battle of wit

The advert pitches a potato against a turkey in a battle of wit

The advert pitches a potato against a turkey in a battle of wit but the potato goes too far when it reveals that turkey eats grain from deforested fields

The group says the factory farms fattening turkeys for Christmas know the feed they use is linked to forest destruction but people play the biggest part in reducing the amount of meat being sold. 

‘We can all make a choice to eat less meat. The world’s top scientists say it’s vital to prevent climate breakdown’, says Chiara Vitali from Greenpeace UK.

She said supermarkets like Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Asda pledging to ‘remove deforestation from their supply chain’ don’t go far enough.

‘This isn’t about switching from one type of feed to another. They need to listen to the science and replace most of the meat they’re selling with plant based alternatives, and they need to do it fast.’

Greenpeace says it felt the need to create the advert to make people realise the impact their eating habits are having on the environment. One of the insults directed at turkey talks about how dry it is as a meat

Greenpeace says it felt the need to create the advert to make people realise the impact their eating habits are having on the environment. One of the insults directed at turkey talks about how dry it is as a meat

The ‘Christmas advert’ battle has become increasingly prominent in recent years with major retailers all attempting to create the most viewed and high profile commercial.

This year John Lewis created a dragon character that lights up a Christmas pudding, Sainsbury’s delves into its past with a chimney sweep and Argos has a dad living out his drumming dreams in the kitchen. 

In 2019 even more companies are hoping to reach a wide audience with their Christmas themed promos.

Walkers signed up the queen of the Christmas hit, Mariah Carey and Iceland employed Hollywood magic through the stars of Frozen. 

One celebrity got a namecheck in the commercial as turkey told potato 'you're dull, you're pasty white and you're impossible to get rid of. You're the Piers Morgan of the Christmas lunch'

One celebrity got a namecheck in the commercial as turkey told potato ‘you’re dull, you’re pasty white and you’re impossible to get rid of. You’re the Piers Morgan of the Christmas lunch’

Greenpeace produced the advert with support from the Nice and Serious agency.

‘To humorously expose the ultimate Christmas conspiracy, we brought two of the main ingredients of Christmas dinner to life in a gloriously surreal fashion’, said Peter Larkin, Creative Director from Nice and Serious.

‘With the rise in popularity of comedy roast battles, we realised we had the perfect characters to create the ultimate showdown.’

The turkey opens with 'It's great to be here roasting the humble potato. People call it a staple food because you'd rather staple your lips together than eat it'

The turkey opens with ‘It’s great to be here roasting the humble potato. People call it a staple food because you’d rather staple your lips together than eat it’

MAP REVEALS THE DEVASTATING RATE OF DEFORESTATION AROUND THE GLOBE

Using Landsat imagery and cloud computing, researchers mapped forest cover worldwide as well as forest loss and gain. Over 12 years, 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest were lost, and 309,000 square miles (800,000 square kilometers) regrew

Using Landsat imagery and cloud computing, researchers mapped forest cover worldwide as well as forest loss and gain. Over 12 years, 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest were lost, and 309,000 square miles (800,000 square kilometers) regrew

The destruction caused by deforestation, wildfires and storms on our planet have been revealed in unprecedented detail.

High-resolution maps released by Google show how global forests experienced an overall loss of 1.5 million sq km during 2000-2012.

For comparison, that’s a loss of forested land equal in size to the entire state of Alaska.

The maps, created by a team involving Nasa, Google and the University of Maryland researchers, used images from the Landsat satellite.

Each pixel in a Landsat image showing an area about the size of a baseball diamond, providing enough data to zoom in on a local region.

Before this, country-to-country comparisons of forestry data were not possible at this level of accuracy.

‘When you put together datasets that employ different methods and definitions, it’s hard to synthesise,’ said Matthew Hansen at the University of Maryland.



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