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Forty-something Brits are most frequent cleaners – but those in 20s most thorough


Adults in their twenties clean their houses just three times a week – but get stuck in with a “deep clean”, and are also more eco-conscious about cleaning products

Nearly three-quarters of older Brits admit their regular cleaning consists of just a quick wipe down of surfaces
Nearly three-quarters of older Brits admit their regular cleaning consists of just a quick wipe down of surfaces

Forty-something Brits are the most frequent cleaners – but those in their twenties are most likely to do a thorough job, a study has found.

The poll of 2,000 adults found those in their 40s, 50s and 60s clean their homes on an average of five days a week.

But more than seven in ten of those admitted that while they clean regularly, it’s often just a quick, general wipe down of surfaces.

And while adults in their twenties clean on just three days a week, they pull their sleeves up and get stuck in with a “deep clean” on those occasions.

Younger generations are most likely to take sole responsibility for cleaning the home as they don’t trust anyone else to live up to their high standards, and also find cleaning more fun or therapeutic than their older counterparts.

It also emerged those aged 18-29 are the most eco-conscious cleaners, who use more chemical-free cleaning products and are most concerned about the harmful substances in their sprays.








Brits in their 60s spend three hours a week mopping and wiping – compared to two and a half hours for 20-29-year-olds
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Image:

Olly Curtis/T3 Magazine/Getty Images)



A spokesman for Plenty Max household towel, which commissioned the research, said: “We’re a houseproud nation, but it’s interesting to see the difference in generations when it comes to our approach to cleaning – particularly chemical-free options.

“And while the older generation clean more regularly, it’s the younger adults who are most likely to do a “deep clean”.

“As the nation adjusts to life post-pandemic, cleaning habits are changing, with the environment and our health also becoming a bigger concern.





“We sometimes forget that just water can go a long way – and if used with the right product, does just as good a job of removing bacteria and leaving surfaces fresh, clean and hygienic – reducing the amount of chemical-based products that may get used around the home and near pets and children.”

The study also found those in their 20s are most likely to set aside whole days to get through their cleaning tasks, with nearly one in five going as far as to say they find it “fun”.

But while more than seven in ten of those aged 40 and above will clean up a mess as soon as it appears, this drops to just 50 percent of 20-29-year-olds.

Adults in their 60s dedicate more than three hours a week to wiping and mopping, compared to two-and-a-half hours for 20-29-year-olds.

However, young adults are showing their green credentials, with 49 percent trying to use chemical-free products, compared to just 30 percent of over 60s.








Four in ten admit they don’t clean their hand towels on a weekly basis
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Image:

John Greim/LightRocket/Getty Images)



They are also twice as likely to be concerned about the chemicals in the cleaning products they use (54 percent of 20-29-year-olds, compared to 33 percent of over 60s).

And three in ten (31 percent) 20-somethings even try to use nothing but water to clean as much as possible.

The study, conducted via OnePoll, also revealed the items and places around the home that we often forget to clean, despite them being germ hotspots.

Nearly four in ten admit they don’t always clean their tea towels on a weekly basis, while 41 percent said the same of their hand towels.

Just 30 percent clean their bin weekly, and only 25 percent wipe their TV remote down.

The spokesman for Plenty Max added: “When it comes to cleaning, we are becoming more conscious of the environment and want to do our bit, while also making sure our home is clean and tidy.”


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