finance

Five new nose-to-tail dining destinations


Manteca, London

The brined, braised and stuffed pig snout at Manteca
The brined, braised and stuffed pig snout at Manteca © Anton Rodriguez

Following a string of successful Soho residencies, chefs Chris Leach (ex-Petersham Nurseries) and David Carter, founder of Smokestak, have settled in Shoreditch. Launched in November, the latest iteration of Manteca revisits its signature hand-rolled pastas alongside an all-new amari cocktail list and in-house salumeria. Leach and Carter give nose-to-tail the Italian treatment, with favourites including the ciccioli (pressed pork scraps), zampone (stuffed trotter) and pig-skin ragú. One dish that Leach is particularly proud of is his stuffed pig snout, which is brined, braised and wrapped in crépinette sausage. “It took a lot of time to perfect as we could only test it when we had our next pig delivered,” he says. There’s an interesting wine list from specialist Emily Acha Derrington. Finish with a plate of ice-cream cannolo. mantecarestaurant.co.uk


Onzieme, Canberra

Wood-roasted pumpkin with baharat spice and pepitas with tahine and herb salad at Onzieme in Canberra
Wood-roasted pumpkin with baharat spice and pepitas with tahine and herb salad at Onzieme in Canberra © Megann Evans

Although whole animal butchery sets the tone of this new restaurant from Canberra chef Louis Couttoupes, the focus is on making as little waste as possible. Lemon peels contribute to in-house sodas; leaves and stems are turned into pickles; and there’s talk of a fermentation programme to help support the bar. The seasonal menu has plenty to dote on, but most popular are Couttoupes’s fish dishes: recently he’s been serving up a pan-fried turbot with wood-grilled engawa fins. An octopus ragú, meanwhile, incorporates the animal’s legs, head and ink. But don’t get too attached; the menu changes on almost a daily basis. onzieme.com.au


Celentano’s, Glasgow

Pappardelle with Dexter beef and corra linn at Celantano’s
Pappardelle with Dexter beef and corra linn at Celantano’s © Naomi Vance

A short walk from Glasgow’s centre will bring you to the old Cathedral House, where husband-and-wife duo Dean and Anna Parker have been serving up Italian-inspired fare since August. A criticism of nose-to-tail dining is that chefs try too hard to source unusual cuts of meat, often disregarding the rest of the animal. But for every cow ordered at Celentano’s, the prime cuts (rump steaks, fillets, shins and short ribs) are served as secondi, and anything leftover is cooked down with oxidised wine from the bar to make a ragú. To start, try the chicken liver mousse – leftovers of which are used in pasta sauces – and house-baked sourdough. celentanosglasgow.com


Falansai, New York

Duck necks, whole duck and Triple Threat at Falansai in New York
Duck necks, whole duck and Triple Threat at Falansai in New York © Adam Friedlander

This Bushwick-based Vietnamese was taken over by chef Eric Tran at the end of 2020. While the name and style of cooking has remained the same, Tran’s menu has given Falansai a new focus: seasonal sourcing, local suppliers and whole animal butchery. Available as a four or “six-ish” course “dac biet” tasting menu, dishes might include sweet-and-sour confit duck necks, chicken-liver brûlée or lamb sausage skewers. The rotating whole fish – served steamed or fried with a spicy peanut-milk curry – is always worth ordering, as are the homemade sodas (peach shrub, concord grape and salted plum). falansai.com


Humble Chicken, London

Humble Chicken aims to use every part of the bird for its yakitori
Humble Chicken aims to use every part of the bird for its yakitori © Carla Barber

Paying homage to Japan’s izakayas – informal bars for post-work drinks and snacks – Humble Chicken is an intimate new restaurant on Frith Street in Soho. Chef Angelo Sato, who trained under Core’s Clare Smyth, is a pioneer of “comb to tail” cooking, using every part of the bird possible for his selection of yakitori (grilled chicken), from heart to liver, cartilage to knee. Squeamish diners might opt for the Hakata pork belly and crispy chicken leg – much less adventurous, but equally delicious. humblechickenuk.com



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