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Fake bot on Twitter poses as overjoyed Amazon worker


An Amazon worker packs items at the Amazon Fulfilment Centre in Peterborough (AFP)

Amazon workers in the US are currently engaged in a vote on whether or not to form a union.

In an attempt to dissuade them, it seems a vocal Amazon employee has taken to Twitter to explain how great it is to work there.

Only, they’re not real.

The account, with the handle @AmazonFCDarla, joined Twitter a few days ago and then started tweeting about how she didn’t like unions.

‘There’s no ability to opt out of dues,’ the account tweeted.

It was quickly noticed by others, who branded it an automatic (bot) account that was created to argue against the unionisation process.

At the time of writing, the account has been suspended from Twitter.

Darla’s account has been branded fake and removed (Twitter)

It appears that Amazon itself realised the account was fake and reported it to Twitter.

What’s not clear is whether the fake account was created by an employee of the company or an outsider.

It’s the latest chapter in the ongoing story over how Amazon staff feel about their employer and the work that’s expected of them

The union discussions happening at Amazon’s facilities in Alabama are the largest in Amazon’s history with 5,800 potential votes on the subject.

The issue is such a contentious one that Amazon has actually formed a (real) Twitter account to combat perceived inaccuracies about the company.

According to Recode, the official Twitter account was created at the behest of Amazon boss Jeff Bezos who wanted execs to ‘fight back’ against its critics.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has reportedly instructed execs to ‘fight back’ against negative criticism (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)

The site states Bezos: ‘expressed dissatisfaction in recent weeks that company officials weren’t more aggressive in how they pushed back against criticisms of the company that he and other leaders deem inaccurate or misleading.’


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