football

England 'given unfair advantage' as Germany banned from training at Wembley before clash


UEFA have banned Germany from training at Wembley ahead of their Euro 2020 last 16 showdown with England on Tuesday due to the amount of rain forecast in London. There have already been concerns about the surface in the past few days and, with plenty of bad weather predicted between now and Tuesday’s nail-biting showdown, UEFA have been forced to step in to avoid ruining the spectacle.

Italy and Austria were also told they could not train at Wembley ahead of their last 16 game last night.

Yet the pitch more than held its own after 120 minutes of action.

Wembley has already played host to all three of England’s games in Group D against Croatia, Scotland and Czech Republic, weeks after hosting a list of cup and play-off finals.

While UEFA have stressed to Sky Sports News that the decision did not come lightly, the ban has been applied to all teams playing their last 16 matches at Wembley.

JUST IN: England boss Gareth Southgate issues Mason Mount and Ben Chillwell update ahead of Germany

Germany have therefore been forced to alter their plans. Joachim Low and his management team have decided they will have an extra training session at their training base in Herzogenaurach before flying to England.

The Three Lions may need all the luck they can get against the Germans, who have their number if previous tournaments are anything to go by.

They dumped England out of Italia 90 and Euro 96 on penalties before inflicting more heartbreak at the World Cup in South Africa in 2010.

But Gareth Southgate remains adamant he does not need to talk up the rivalry to his players, who will play the game, not the occasion.

“I don’t need to demystify it,” said Southgate, who missed the decisive penalty at Wembley in 1996.

“The history is an irrelevance for them.

“We’ve got boys born into the 2000s, which is obviously scary, but it’s the reality of the group we’re dealing with.

“It’s of no consequence to them what we did in, you know, Peter Bonetti in 1970 and what happened in 1990 and so on.

“Of course, they’re watching that stuff and getting a bit of an understanding of it but it’s not something we’re speaking to them about.

“This team has put down lots of historical performances in the last couple of years, made their own history, made their own stories and this is how they should view this game.

“It’s an opportunity. We’ve only won one knockout match in a European Championship as a country, so they’ve got a great chance to go and be the first team since 1996 to do that.”





READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.  Learn more