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Amy Schumer makes a hilarious 'in-person' appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show


She has been quarantining on Martha’s Vineyard with her husband Chris Fischer and her son Gene since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

But Amy Schumer made her first ‘in-person’ studio appearance — sort of — on an episode of The Ellen DeGeneres Show that airs Tuesday.

The 39-year-old comedienne created a sense of realism with a hilarious pair of fake legs, even as she got serious by speaking about her recent spate of racial justice protests. She also shared new photos of her son Gene, age one.

Almost there: Amy Schumer, 39, made her first 'in-person' appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show for an episode airing Tuesday, though she had some help from a pair of humorous fake legs

Almost there: Amy Schumer, 39, made her first ‘in-person’ appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show for an episode airing Tuesday, though she had some help from a pair of humorous fake legs

Although Amy and Ellen, 62, jokingly pretended she was in the studio, she actually filmed her segment from the comfort of her home thanks to a green screen.

Her upper torso was pictured on a large screen propped up on the guest chair, while a set of legs with a yellow skirt and pink heels were set up underneath it.

Amy opened her interview by keeping up the joke and referencing her legs.

‘My legs, are they too pale? I was so nervous,’ she said while beaming.

‘I was going to use self-tanner, but at the last second decided just to go out there and dress up Amy and go down to the studio and look your best. And here I am!’

No fuss: Amy joked about her pasty fake legs. ''I was going to use self-tanner, but at the last second decided just to go out there and dress up Amy and go down to the studio and look your best. And here I am!'

No fuss: Amy joked about her pasty fake legs. ”I was going to use self-tanner, but at the last second decided just to go out there and dress up Amy and go down to the studio and look your best. And here I am!’

Whoops: Amy talked about changing her son's name from Gene Attell Fischer to Gene David Fischer because it sounded too much like 'genital fissure'

Whoops: Amy talked about changing her son’s name from Gene Attell Fischer to Gene David Fischer because it sounded too much like ‘genital fissure’

After getting the jokes out of the way, Ellen mentioned that she hadn’t seen Amy since she gave birth to her son Gene last year.

The mom also talked about how Gene’s first word was mom. Schumer then added: ‘Or maybe he said bomb. Either way, I was excited.’

The two women shared a laugh after bringing up how Amy recently changed Gene’s middle name from Attell to David.

‘You know how sometimes parents by accident name their children “genital”?’ Amy joked, before explaining she originally wanted to pay tribute to her husband mother with Gene’s first name, while his middle name came from her good friend, the comedian Dave Attell.

Unfortunately, his name ended up sounding a bit too much like ‘genital fissure,’ according to Amy, so they instead changed his middle name to David to still pay tribute to Attell.

Taking a knee: Later, their conversation took a serious note as Amy opened up about her protests in honor of Black Americans slain by the police, which she does every day at 10:30 a.m. in Martha's Vineyard

Taking a knee: Later, their conversation took a serious note as Amy opened up about her protests in honor of Black Americans slain by the police, which she does every day at 10:30 a.m. in Martha’s Vineyard

Later, their conversation took a serious note as Amy opened up about her daily protests in honor of Black Americans slain by the police, which she does every day at 10:30 a.m. in Martha’s Vineyard.

The Trainwreck star was inspired after seeing a woman named Dana Nunez stand in a median daily to protest after George Floyd was killed by a white police officer who pressed his knee into his neck until he stopped breathing.

‘We decided to come back the next day at 10:30 to kneel for George Floyd, and we’ve met every morning since the beginning of June.’

Since then, the group of daily protesters in the seaside town has grown to 50–100 protestors each day.

‘Every day, we honor the life of a different person of color whose life was stolen by law enforcement,’ she said somberly.

Making herself heard: 'Every day, we honor the life of a different person of color whose life was stolen by law enforcement,' she said somberly of the group, which numbers 50–100 people per day

Making herself heard: ‘Every day, we honor the life of a different person of color whose life was stolen by law enforcement,’ she said somberly of the group, which numbers 50–100 people per day

Elsewhere in the interview, Amy opened up about her pregnancy and filming her HBO docuseries Expecting Amy, which documented her struggles with hyperemesis, an extreme form of morning sickness.

The documentary began as a low-budget affair before expanding.

‘We started filming on our cell phones,’ Amy admitted.

‘I think it was actually, in retrospect, a defense mechanism, because I was so sick and I felt like having a witness — like I wasn’t going through it alone,’ she explained.

The stand-up comic also joked about the well-meaning advice from other parents.

‘People cannot stop giving you advice while you’re pregnant — I don’t know if you know that. Everyone was telling me I had to do prenatal yoga, that it would help with child birth. So I obviously signed up immediately for a C-section,’ she said to laughter from Ellen and the audience.

Thinking ahead: Amy explained that she began documenting her terrible morning sickness on her cell phone for what became her HBO docuseries Expecting Amy

Thinking ahead: Amy explained that she began documenting her terrible morning sickness on her cell phone for what became her HBO docuseries Expecting Amy



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